A little chat about alternative facts

I have always enjoyed the precision of carpentry.    How many other things in life are so simple?    Success is a surefire thing if one measures carefully, cuts the correct angles, and uses the right fasteners while keeping everything plumb and square along the way.

Real life of course is much more complicated..   Take animal welfare for instance.    On the surface it should be so simple.   People with kind hearts want to save lives.   What could be easier than that?

Of course , here in the real world the waters are often muddied by misconceptions that gain legs and gallop around Facebook.    At best they cause hard feelings.   At worst, they polarize the very people who should be working together if we are ever to get to No Kill Nova Scotia.

Fallacy #1 –  All branches of the Nova Scotia SPCA are open admission.   And before the keyboards catch on fire, yes I know they are ever so much better than they were nine years ago.   But they are not Open Admission anywhere … yet.     How did the idea that they are all open admission take root?    The short version is that in March of this year, the Dartmouth shelter did an open admission trial run.

How did that work out?   Very well as a matter of fact … so much so that “The director said this approach to intake could expand to other times of the year depending on the demands of breeding season and to their other shelters as well.”      Personally, I think that is a wonderful step forward in the right direction.

But I am wandering afield as I am wont to do in my meandering way.   This little “alternative fact” is often used to justify importing homeless dogs into this province.   Not to be mean, but as of this writing, any group using that to justify bringing dogs in from away is living in a dream world.

Fallacy #2.    Nova Scotia is already at No Kill.    And before the keyboards catch on fire, yes Virginia I know that we have No Kill rescue organizations here in Nova Scotia.    But here is the thing.   This is Canada and we have a completely different system of doing things than the States.

What does that mean in realspeak?    Simply that rescue and shelter statistics only paint a small part of the picture.     Why would I say that?     Because there are not enough rescue slots for all of the pets in need in this province.  

So there is no possible way to determine how many treatable and adoptable pets are killed in this province.    Why?   For starters, no animal clinic in this province is ever going publicly publish the number of treatable and adoptable pets that get the short end of the long needle.   Nor can anyone track how many abandoned pets become road kill or part of the food chain.   Saddest of all of course is that there is no registry for the unwanted ones that are drowned or shot 🙁

What does this mean in realspeak?    Simply that this is just another ‘alternative fact’ that is used to justify importing homeless dogs into this province.    At best, rescues spreading this misinformation have not done their due diligence.   At worst, those importing dogs have simply placed the lives of homeless Nova Scotia dogs at the bottom of their priority list.

Fallacy #3.   It is commonly believed that all pets imported into Canada meet the same health standards required of  locally adopted or sold pets in Nova Scotia.      Actually, the only thing that imported pets require is proof of a rabies vaccine.   Any other possible inspections are usually sidestepped by claiming the dogs are personal pets.

The whole problem is summed up very nicely in this report by a working group of Canadian Veterinarians.

Does this mean that kind hearts who are moved by the plight of southern dogs in high kill shelters cannot do anything to help?   Of course not.   Even though Canadians cannot claim donations to American rescues on their taxes, cash donations to supporting rescues there would always be helpful.

There is of course the dodgy issue that there is no way to determine how helpful importing dogs actually is.    Lets face it .. there is a fine line between helping and enabling, eh?   Without meaningful measures such as low cost spay neuter at the source, pulling dogs out of high kill shelters simply creates a vacuum that will quickly be filled.

What is the bottom line?   As far as I am concerned, it is really quite simple.  It is not my job to think for everybody else.   Who am I to scold a rescue for the choices they make?

That being said, any group that takes donations from the public has an obligation to be transparent with donors and supporters.

Of course, it would be slim pickings for any group with enough balls to admit that the lives of homeless dogs here in Nova Scotia don’t really matter to them.   Or that they were not experienced enough to understand the implications of importing more homeless dogs into a little province like this.     Very slim pickings indeed.

According to the Canadian Animal Health Institute, there were an estimated 7.6 million dog owners in Canada in 2016.    Wow!    Seven point six million tax paying voters who care about the health and well being of their companions.    7.6 million people who are going to pretty darned upset if they wind up paying big vet bills for diseases that were actually imported into this country by starry eyed, well meaning rescuers.

What time is it?    Instead of advocating for regulations for rescue, perhaps it is time to focus on the need for stricter Federal rules for importing all dogs, including owned personal pets.    It would be a simple step that would protect the health and well being .. and financial security of 7.6 million dog owners.   What better win/ win for our Federal MP’s could there be than that?

A little drizzly day musing

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I love a good rainy day at this time of year.     Dreary days like this are wonderful for kickstarting all the perennials and spring flowering bulbs.    My may flowering tulips are bursting into bloom and my elusive Canada 150 tulips have finally begun to peek out.

We don’t generally get a lot of politicians out here.   Are they worried that our dreadful old road will be too hard on their cars?    This time around, I expect that Leo Glavine will not be particularly interested in trying to explain why “putting patients first” still seems to be on the back burner.    And of course there is always the cold hard reality that many consider it an inefficient use of time to campaign on a road with sixteen houses at best.

Although, to be fair, Chris Palmer did show up here when he ran in 2009 and that same year it is entirely possible that I may have scared Leo Glavine away for good by asking uncomfortable questions about animal welfare.

But this is a new year and a new election.   On the off chance that anyone does stop by, I have a little list of questions ready.

#1. Will you / your party write a new regulation for the Animal Protection Act to ban Declawing? If not, why?

#2 Will you / your party amend the Municipal Act to prohibit breed bans. If not, why?

#3 Will you / your party amend the Municipal Act to obligate all Municipal Animal Departments, and by extension their contractors, to publicly advertise all impounded animals. To list all impounded strays on the Nova Scotia Lost Dog Network? To allow the impounded animals to be transferred to rescue when the impound period is up? And last but not least, to require all Municipalities and their contractors to post Animal Control Statistics on their Municipal Websites.  If not, why?

#4 Will your party liaise with SPCANS to include humane education in the Nova Scotia Elementary School curriculum?

#5 Will you / your party support legislation to ban the use of electric shock collars, prong collars and electronic fences?   If not, why?

#6 And last but not least, will you / your party write a new regulation for the Animal Protection Act to require all rescue animals imported from outside Nova Scotia to have a certificate of health from a Nova Scotia veterinarian?   If not, why?

Oh … and PS … can you please fix our darned road ?

 

Sheesh …. it is entirely possible that I did scare Leo away with a similar list before!

But here is the thing … we DO live in democracy and we ARE allowed to express our opinions on issues that matter to us to our politicians.    There simply is no better time to communicate these concerns than during an election.

What time is it?   At the risk of sounding like a stuck record, it is always time to remember that the way ahead for the animals will only ever be paved by strong voter feedback.   If you are wondering who is running in your riding, PLEASE CLICK HERE

The best thing about this group of candidates is that only one of them can win.      Will Rogers